30 October 2006

MyBlogLog - A Tory Bloggers Tool?

I like MyBlogLog. I’m signed up for a year with them and it’s my only sites stats instrument. Many of the occasional visitors to my site use it and get listed on the recent readers sidebar, which is an interesting feature. Yesterday evening, the blogfather himself Iain Dale popped up – the only thing is I’ve no idea how long he stayed. It’s also handy for marketing my site as my visits to other sites that have the sidebar are shown whether or not I want to post a comment. One thing I’ve noticed is that although the mybloglog is extremely popular with right-wing bloggers, Tom Watson and Political Hack are the only Labour bloggers that I’ve noticed using it – and they don’t use the sidebar on their sites. I wonder why it hasn’t taken off in the same way with the Lefties. Or maybe I'm being myopic?

6 comments:

Bloggers4Labour said...

I've had a free account for a while, just never got around to inserting the code. Might be interesting - don't need the stats, though.

Ellee said...

Is this where there are lots of others in the same community? I think I've signed up to it, haven't been able to add my pic, and I'm not sure what to do with it.

Praguetory said...

Yes, sounds like the one, Ellee. It's a bit long ago for me to remember how I did it. I would e-mail bugs@mybloglog.com with your website name and maybe the pic you want to use and ask if they can help.

The Sads said...

to be honest it just makes me sad

rafer said...

As a Yank, I haven't quite got your factions sorted, but aren't at least some of these guys on your side of the aisle?

http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/community/libdemblogs/

or is liberal not at all related to Labor (as it would be in the US), and i'm confused again?

Praguetory said...

Hi Rafer, Thanks for pointing out the LibDem's use of myblog. The Conservative Party's roots are at the right of politics. Another word (sometimes pejorative) for a Conservative is a Tory. I'm a Tory. You're quite right that Labour's roots are to the left (unions etc). The LibDems are traditionally known in British politics as the centre party. They have gained a significant share of the popular vote for quite some time, but due to our first past the post system this did not translate into many Parliamentary seats until recently when they have managed to concentrate support in certain geographical areas/demographic groups. If current polling trends hold steady, in order to gain power one of the larger parties may need to coalesce with the LibDems after the next general election to form a government.